Author Archives: Nigel Rodgers

Quiet Scotland’s new Community Forum

Quiet Scotland (Pipedown Scotland) now has an on-line forum or chat site where members can exchange views, ask questions, share news or just chat. To access the forum, go to the main website (www.quietscotland.org.uk), then click on the “Forum” link at the top of the page.  NB The forum will be visible in Google, and anybody – not just Quiet Scotland members – will be able to read its contents. So don’t post anything that might be considered sensitive or confidential.  To post to the forum  you will need to register. This is a simple one-off process. Just click the “Register” link in the black menu bar near the top of the page.

Quiet Scotland has tried to keep the whole thing as simple as possible. If you get stuck, look at the Help pages (from the green link near the top-right corner). If you can’t register or log in, email mlewis@ml-consult.co.uk.  If Quiet Scotland’s forum proves a success, Pipedown UK may start its own forum. 

 

More supermarkets introduce ‘Quiet Hours’

Tesco in Marlborough has introduced a Quiet Hour’ every Wednesday from 2-3pm. A customer, Nicola Barker, who finds noise physically painful, had protested and Matt Jones, listened to her protests and decided to act. We wanted to help our customers and make shopping easier for them,’ he said. Not only piped music but tannoy announcements and bright lights are muted during this weekly hour of peace. Since introducing the Quiet Hour, staff in Marlborough have noticed ‘many more customers benefitting from the less intense experience.’ There is as yet no plan by Tesco to expand Quiet Hours nationally, however. We sneed to keep writing to Tesco’s CEO Dave Lewis dave.lewis@uk.tesco.com

Meanwhile the Co-op has been running similar  ‘autism awareness hours’ at some of their branches across the country and will be ‘running more going forward.’

M&S goes quiet – for a time?

Marks and Spencer has finished its ‘trialling’ of piped music in 35 stores around the UK. What happens next – whether it reinstates piped music or sticks to its quiet policy – is chiefly up to us. We need to keep protesting to its head office and in local branches. Its CEO is Steve Rowe rowe@marks-and-spencer.com

The Invisible Disability: a clear of case of discrimination against the disabled?

A person unable to walk is clearly and visibly disabled. Someone who is blind is equally clearly  disabled. But people afflicted by whole range of invisible  disabilities – from tinnitus to GAD (general anxiety disorder), from misophonia to autism, from presbycusis  to hyperacusis to ME – often do not appear disabled. Yet in  important ways they are. For such people piped music is no mere irritant but a crippling torment. This applies also to those with general hearing problems (one in six of the population, according to Action on Hearing Loss). All these people in effect suffer from an Invisible Disability. And almost nothing is being done for them.  Recent moves to provide the odd Quiet Hour by ASDA and Morrisons are still little more than tokenism. Many organisations,  from banks to hospitals to restaurants, are arguably breaking existing law.

According to the Department for Work and Pensions, the Equality Act of 2010 “requires service providers to make a reasonable adjustment for disabled people to make sure that they are not places at a substantial disadvantage compared to non-disabled people. This may include such actions are accommodating requests for communications to be conducted in a particular format. A failure by a service provider to make reasonable adjustment for a disabled person could amount to direct disability discrimination under the Act. (My italics.) What is ‘reasonable’ will vary from one situation to another because of factors such as the practicality of making the adjustment, the cost of the adjustment and the resources available to different providers.”

As the cost of adjusting – i.e. turning off – piped music is almost nil, and it is very easy, there seems no valid reason why all organisations should not be expected to turn off their piped music when requested to do so. Those who fail to do so are guilty of discrimination.

The DWP adds: “If a person feels they have been discriminated against, the Equality Advisory and Support Service (EASS) provides free bespoke advice and in depth support to individuals with discrimination concerns.” The EASS can be contacted: easeass@mailgb.custhelp.com or Freephone 0808 800 0082  or FREEPOST EASS HELPLINE FPN 6521

The DWP concludes: “The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) has a monitoring and enforcement role in relation to the Equality Act 2010. It has a power to enforce a breach of any of the Act’s provisions, including the disability discrimination provisions, and to challenge organisations where required.”

Any individuals who fall into one of the ‘invisibly disabled’ categories ought to challenge  places with piped music, utilising this and other  information. Do tell Pipedown of your experiences – setbacks as well as victories – so that we can collate information and approach the Department of Health and the Noise Team at DEFRA  with our findings.

 

(Many thanks to Anne Brown who winkled out this information and suggested the phrase.)

 

Pipedown Canada starting up

Piped music is a global problem but one best dealt with nationally, even locally. Each country has specific problems.

Katie, who lives in Toronto, plans to start a Canadian branch of Pipedown. If you live in Canada – or even just across the border in the USA – do contact her at caitlinkingston@gmail.com

It is very early days yet but there should be a Pipedown Canada website up soon.

Morrisons introduce Quiet Hour for shoppers with autism

Morrisons, the supermarket chain, is introducing a Quiet Hour every Saturday morning. Its 439 UK stores will turn off their piped music, dim lights, avoid using the tannoy and turn down check-out beeps  from 09:00 to 10:00. Morrisons is the first major supermarket chain to roll out the scheme to all stores nationwide.

The National Autistic Society called it a ‘step in the right direction’. It is indeed only a step because, although Morrison’s initiative is welcome, one hour per week of quiet shopping is not nearly enough! Nor are the estimated nearly 700,000 people (1% of the nation) with autism the only ones who find piped music deeply upsetting. The 15% of the population with hearing problems – which can include everything from tinnitus, presbycusis and misphonia to moderate deafness – also detest piped music. So of course do many people with perfect hearing.

Other chains are considering following suit. Asda said a number of its supermarkets across the country already worked with local groups to run quiet hours on a regular basis. It added it was working with specialist charity groups to ensure its stores were inclusive for all.

Tesco said it was not planning on rolling out the initiative nationwide, but store managers were welcome to introduce it if they felt it appropriate – as one store in Alloa, Clackmannanshire, did last year. And Sainsbury’s said more than 600 of its stores took part in the National Autistic Society’s Autism Hour in October last year and will be doing so again this year. In three of its Liverpool-based stores, where staff have received training, parents can request a number of store modifications when they begin their shopping trip, it added.

All such moves should be applauded and the chains concerned urged to extend their Quiet Hours greatly. Write to David Potts, CEO of Morrisons, congratulating him and urging him to extend the scheme to other days/times of the week.  david.potts-ceo@morrisonsplc.co.uk

 

Red buttons to mute television music?

A recurrent complaint about otherwise excellent television documentaries is their intrusive, often inappropriate music. (For some reason this is particularly bad on wildlife programmes but it mars many other documentaries too). For years the relevant authorities, especially at the BBC, have shrugged off complaints with bland or irrelevant comments (such as suggesting you use subtitles), leaving frustrated viewers having either to mute the programme or to turn it off .

NB All music, along with other sounds including ‘natural’ noises, is dubbed in later. 

Now, news arrives that the Red Button on the remote control can be used to mute the commentary. If it can be used to mute commentaries, it can surely be used to mute music too, something Pipedown has long urged. While this may require further adjustments, it cannot be technically impossible.

Yet the BBC does not want to know! Its management prefers to ignore the fact that many of its viewers are likely to be over 50, and thus annoyed by piped music of any sort. 

Complain via the BBC website bbc_complaints_website@bbc.co.uk”  It is not possible to email any person directy .

Quiet Corners revamped!

Quiet Corners, which lists muzak-free pubs, hotels, restaurants, shops etc has been rejigged by our heroically indefatigable hon webmaster Chris Chinnery. It is now possible to type in your location and see what tranquil places have been suggested (by members) within 10, 25 or 50 miles. At present this revamp is not quite complete but it soon will be. Ultimately it should be possible also to download an app to your mobile. Seehttps://quietcorners.org.uk

The Coop chain is voted our next target – and so is the Nationwide Building Society

The Coop supermarket chain has won the wooden spoon of being voted the worst  offender for piped music. Although the chain is not everyone’s choice of shop, it is often the only place that the most vulnerable in society – those who cannot drive for whatever reason, for example – find they have to do their shopping. It is also a chain that loudly proclaims its ethical ideals.               So whether or not you shop there regularly, write in protest to its CEO Steve Murrells steve.murrells@co-operative.coop

(NB: Not every branch of the Co-op is controlled by the London HQ. The East Anglia and Midlands branches have some autonomy, so it is wise to check the status of a branch before making a protest.)

Email steve.murrells@co-operative.coop

The Nationwide Building Society, which until recently prided itself on not  having piped music, is now introducing it, doubtless misled by the mendacious propaganda of the piped music industry. Email  www.nationwide.co.uk/support/contact-us/make-a-complaint or  by post to The Complaints Team, Nationwide Building Society  NW 2020, Swindon SN38 1NW    As the Nationwide is still  converting once pleasant branches to muzac-filled places of torment, it is well worth writing NOW.